Apifera Farm - where art, story, animals & woman merge. Home to artist Katherine Dunn

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Thursday, June 18, 2009

Not bad for dirt farmers

In which I proudly show more from our garden, including the fact we finally have some consist ant red in the mix, which hasn't been easy.One of my other favorites, wild clover mixed with the lavender. Martyn has adapted to the fact I like to work 'weeds' into the garden mix.




10 comments:

Flassie's Fil'a said...

Best part is that you can
use that clover. I like it
in rice.

Here is a link to use it in
recipes.

Prodigalgardens

I hope the link works.

Lovely beautiful garden.

Is that a rose that looks
like it isn't attached to
anything in the first photo?

God Bless You and Yours!!!

Zan Asha said...

Amazing! I love it, I can't believe you have time to plant and tend a garden with the million other things you do!

Apifera Farm said...

Well thank,s Flassie, I'll check that out! And that rose is a 'survivor'. I wanted deep red roses so planted a couple cutting varieties two years ago, but they were eaten by deer, or slowly died, etc. But I left the one stalk in the ground, forgetting about it. And this year that beautiful rose appeared!

ZAn- We actually worked our butts off the first two years tilling, planting, and lost a lot of plants. Then we mulched when we had the spare change. Out here [versus Portland] it seems to take most things 3 seasons to really get root strength, even with some water. It's just hotter and drier. SO now, the garden is pretty good and thriving. I had another big side garden when we first got here, but transplanted it, just too much upkeep and I turned it into part of animal pasture by my side studio.

Apifera Farm said...

Well thank,s Flassie, I'll check that out! And that rose is a 'survivor'. I wanted deep red roses so planted a couple cutting varieties two years ago, but they were eaten by deer, or slowly died, etc. But I left the one stalk in the ground, forgetting about it. And this year that beautiful rose appeared!

ZAn- We actually worked our butts off the first two years tilling, planting, and lost a lot of plants. Then we mulched when we had the spare change. Out here [versus Portland] it seems to take most things 3 seasons to really get root strength, even with some water. It's just hotter and drier. SO now, the garden is pretty good and thriving. I had another big side garden when we first got here, but transplanted it, just too much upkeep and I turned it into part of animal pasture by my side studio.

Emma said...

Gorgeous!

DellaRae said...

Your garden is beautiful. I can't imagine the time it takes to tend it....but well worth the effort.

NanaBeast said...

Sending you love and good wishes for your pie day this Sunday. I am praying it is a huge success. Wish (A WHOLE LOT) I could be there because I love your blog and would love to meet Pino and all his cohorts (you, included!) I'll be with you in spirit.

Apifera Farm said...

Thanks, all. The tending isn't that bad now that it's mature...but then again, I guess I say that comparing it to the backbreaking work of the lavender field! Gardening is so therapeutic. I work off many a worry, many a rant in the garden...
love to all and thanks to all who have been sending messages to Pino for his Pie Day. We wish you could all come!

Claire said...

Beautiful. We have the same achillea, by the looks of it. I get a lot of my perennials from Bluestone. The brick red colored one is the one I have.

All the best for pie day!

Yarni Gras! said...

love that lamb's ear! ours in Texas were huge like that. The ones in our garden right now are about half that size...but they are 2 years old.....hopefully, they'll continue to thrive!

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Thank you for reading! The farm and my art/writing keep me hopping, so might not respond immediately. Thank you for understanding. ~Katherine & Apifera ~